Haldol during pregnancy

The influence of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of haloperidol has not been evaluated. About one-third of a haloperidol dose is excreted in urine, mostly as metabolites. Less than 3% of administered haloperidol is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Haloperidol metabolites are not considered to make a significant contribution to its activity, although for the reduced metabolite of haloperidol, back-conversion to haloperidol cannot be fully ruled out. Even though impairment of renal function is not expected to affect haloperidol elimination to a clinically relevant extent, caution is advised in patients with renal impairment, and especially those with severe impairment, due to the long half-life of haloperidol and its reduced metabolite, and the possibility of accumulation (see section ).

Atypical antipsychotics have replaced typical agents as first-line therapy for psychotic disorders because these drugs are better tolerated and may be more effective in managing the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. The reproductive safety data on atypical antipsychotics are limited, but the use of olanzapine (Zyprexa), risperidone (Risperdal), quetiapine (Seroquel), and clozapine (Clozaril) has been associated with increased rates of low birth weight and therapeutic abortion. No long-term studies of children exposed to atypical antipsychotics during gestation have been conducted. Therefore, the routine use of these drugs during pregnancy and lactation is not recommended.

Haldol during pregnancy

haldol during pregnancy

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